Rebates! Rebates! Rebates! Part One: Federal Credits

And you thought federal rebates for your home’s HVAC were gone….well, they’re BA-ACK!!

Below are the exact products that qualify for a federal tax credit.

  • Advanced Main Air Circulating Fan

    An Advanced Main Air Circulating Fan is an efficient fan, or blower motor which blows the air that your furnace heats up through the duct system.

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    Tax Credit Amount: $50
    Requirements

    Must use no more than 2% of the furnace’s total energy.

  • Air Source Heat Pumps

    Heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners in moderate climates. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into your warm house; during the cooling season, heat pumps move heat from your cool house into the warm outdoors. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to 4 times the amount of energy they consume.

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    Tax Credit Amount: $300
    Requirements

    Split Systems:
    HSPF ≥ 8.5
    EER ≥ 12.5
    SEER ≥ 15

    Package systems:
    HSPF ≥ 8
    EER ≥ 12
    SEER ≥ 14

  • Central Air Conditioning (CAC)

    The best way to find tax credit eligible CACs is to ask your HVAC Contractor (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning). To verify tax credit eligibility, ask your HVAC contractor to provide the Manufacturer Certification Statement for the equipment you plan to purchase. Or, search the Manufacturer’s website.

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    Tax Credit Amount: $300
    Requirements

    Split Systems:
    SEER ≥ 16
    EER ≥ 13

    Package systems:
    SEER ≥ 14
    EER ≥ 12

  • Gas, Propane, or Oil Hot Water Boiler

    These are heating units that use water circulated throughout the home in a system of baseboard heating units, radiators, and/or in-floor radiant tubing.

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    Tax Credit Amount: $150
    Requirements

    AFUE ≥ 95

    Tax Credit includes installation costs.

  • Natural Gas, Propane or Oil Furnace

    A furnace uses the combustion of fuel and air to create heat.

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    Tax Credit Amount: $150
    Requirements

    AFUE ≥ 95

    Questions? Ask! Email us, submit a form online, or call us at 770-253-2665.

    All information courtesy of EnergyStar.gov.

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Heating FAQ: Part 4, More Gas

Another post in our commonly asked questions series…more about gas that heats your home. Remember to ask questions in our comments section if we have not listed yours yet, and we’d be glad to help you!

What is AFUE?

– AFUE is the abbreviation for Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency ratio. AFUE is used to rate furnace efficiencies by dividing the ratio of heat output by heat input. This measurement describes how well fuel, gas or oil is consumed to produce heat by a furnace. As the AFUE rate increases, the efficiency of your furnace also increases, lowering your fuel costs.

I would like to put a propane gas furnace in my basement because natural gas is not available, but I was not allowed to. Why is this?

– Code requirements for furnace installations are a protection for homeowners. In this case, the concern is that propane gas [since propane is heavier than air] may accumulate in the basement and lead to a dangerous situation. Please discuss any installation questions with your local heating contractor or local building authority.

Which fuel type is the least expensive to operate?

– This is something that is constantly changing. Propane and oil fuel pricing are not regulated by the government so they fluctuate by market supply and demands. Electricity and natural gas are regulated by the Public Utility Commission, so those prices are more stable. A dual-fuel system [i.e., natural gas and a heat pump] is recommended so you are not dependent upon one fuel source establishing your cost of operation.

What fuel type is the least comfortable?

– A heat pump the least comfortable due to the tepid temperature of the air. The temp of the air changes about twenty degrees coming out of the registers. If you have your thermostat set at 73 degrees Fahrenheit in the winter, the air coming out of the registers will be about 93 degree Fahrenheit. Since your body temp is about 98 degrees Fahrenheit, this air will feel cool. A home heated with a heat pump will often need a humidifier to feel warm in the winter.

You can find more questions and answers at our website, and we always update with helpful hints on Facebook. Connect with us!