It’s Coming! You Guessed It…..Allergy Season.

Spring is upon us and, while Coweta County’s beauty is flourishing as nature blooms, many of us are beginning to suffer our dreaded spring allergies. The pollen count is getting higher with grass, ragweed, trees, and various other plants in bloom; damp and humid temperatures will soon give way to mold; and those cool spring and summer breezes blowing through the windows we all enjoy will circulate dust and other allergens around our homes. But spring doesn’t need to be bleak for allergy sufferers; just follow these HVAC maintenance tips to ease your allergies.

  1. Purchase high quality filters. Filters are your HVAC system’s way of defending you against allergens; filters keep allergens out so they won’t circulate through your home. You want to purchase high quality filters so they do their job properly.
  2. Change filters regularly. Filters trap dirt, pollen, dust, and other allergens. At some point, those filters must be changed so they can continue to trap allergens while still allowing air to circulate effectively. Filters should be changed every couple of months, with the exact amount of time dependent on your specific filter and HVAC system. If you see the filters are getting dirty before the regularly scheduled change, you may want to change them early.
  3. Your ducts may need cleaning. If your home hasn’t had regular HVAC maintenance or if you suspect there is mold or debris inside of your ducts, then you should have your ducts cleaned to remove allergens. This is a good tip to keep in mind before cranking up the heat again in the fall. Your ducts accumulate dust and other allergens all summer, so when you first turn your heating unit on those allergens will circulate throughout the house.
  4. Get rid of debris around units. Keep the area around your indoor and outdoor units clean and free of debris. Outdoor units pull air, and while the filter is there to catch the debris you don’t want to make the filter work harder if it doesn’t need to. Excessive debris will cause your filters to get dirtier faster, which means you will need to change your filters more frequently. Indoor units will circulate the air that is already inside of the house and any other allergens that are already inside of the house. If there is dust, dirt, or pet dander in front of your unit, those allergens will get circulated around the house when the unit blows the air.
  5. Don’t forget to dust. It’s common for people to forget to dust registers and return vents, but they can’t be overlooked because they circulate all of the air from the HVAC system. You don’t want registers and vents circulating allergens with the air.

Need help with your indoor air quality? Call us at 770-253-2665 or set an appointment up here.

Advertisements

Progressive Heating and Air’s 2016 Christmas Video


Preventative Maintenance Tips

It’s that time of year again in the South when the climate cannot make up its mind. One day we’ll be in a heat advisory, and the next it could be a cool, fall day. With the season changes, it may also be hard to check on your appliances and program your HVAC system.

When it comes to your heating and cooling system, there are some guidelines to assist you ease into the fall and winter seasons. First, by placing a programmable thermostat in your home, you can reduce the energy bills and raise the comfort level year round. A programmable thermostat will allow you to alter the temperature based on the time of day, according to your needs.

Another efficient method to save cash and maintain your heating and cooling system to operate effectively year round is with regular checkups on the appliances. Through servicing your HVAC on a regular basis, your local specialist can repair any minor problems with the system before they become larger, costly issues. At Progressive Heating and Air, we recommend having your system serviced at the end of each season.

 

Preventative Maintenance Tips for your HVAC System

Taking care of your home’s HVAC system does not have to be hard or expensive. Follow these preventive maintenance tips to help improve comfort and reduce energy costs:

  • Always keep the furnace filter clean. A filter that is clogged creates the heating system to perform harder, reducing its lifespan. Replacing the filter once a month in the winter is highly recommended.

  • Keep the exterior condenser clean. Ensure that no snow, leaves, shrubs or other debris is cleared away at all times.

  • If your furnace is vented at the side of the house, make sure to keep ice from storing in the vent and shovel the areas surrounding the vent.

 

A call to your local expert can keep your appliances operating efficiently for years to come. A professional will be able to inspect any possible issues and have the ability to solve them before they get worse. For more information, contact Progressive Heating and Air today at 770-253-2665, or schedule online!


What Is The Perfect Temperature for Sleep?

If you are having trouble sleeping at night, sleep experts have plenty of helpful tips for you to try, including taking sleep medicine, switching out your mattress or using a white noise machine. However, while all of these suggestions are helpful, they won’t help much if your room is not kept at the ideal temperature for sleep. As it turns out, heating and cooling your room can make a world of difference.

Your body has internal mechanisms that are responsible for heating and cooling your body, and these mechanisms decrease your temperature every night while you sleep. Your brain prefers to be cooler at night time. If your room is too hot or too cold, your brain has a harder time achieving your ideal temperature. It finds heating and cooling your body too strenuous. This can either wake you up in the middle of the night, or it can keep you from falling asleep in the first place.

According to scientists, the best temperature for sleeping for most people is around 65 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit. This temperature range is just right for most people to achieve the deep sleep they need.

Of course, the temperature that each individual sleeps best at will vary, even among members of the same family. It is not uncommon for some people to enjoy sleeping at a temperature as low as 60 degrees while others prefer a temperature as warm as 75 degrees. It all depends on the person and their individual heating and cooling preferences.

If you are having trouble getting the sleep you need and you have tried all of the usual techniques without success, you may want to try additional heating and cooling at night to see if that has any effect. Simply raise or lower the thermostat a few degrees each night and see if it makes any difference. You never know until you try. A few degrees of heating and cooling may be all you need.

Information courtesy of All Star Heating, Cooling and Plumbing


Meet Management at PHAC!


Our Core Values

We hope you enjoy this video!


Carbon Monoxide Detectors: A Must-Have for Home Safety

Carbon monoxide detectors are always on guard against the presence of the dangerous gas, and it’s important to check your detectors regularly to make sure they’re operating properly. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most common cause of poisoning deaths in the developed world, so don’t take chances when it comes to CO safety in your home.

Carbon monoxide gas is produced by fuel combustion. Malfunctioning or improperly-vented gas-fired stoves, furnaces and water heaters are all potential indoor sources of this invisible, odorless gas. Carbon monoxide detectors measure not only the level of carbon monoxide in the air, but also duration of exposure. When both factors exceed safe limits, the unit sounds a piercing alarm to alert residents.

To function reliably, carbon monoxide detectors require two critical maintenance procedures:

Test the Detector

This monthly testing procedure is standard for most models, but check your owner’s manual to make sure.

  • Press the “test” button on the front of the detector and hold it down for several seconds until you hear the alarm. Release the button when the alarm sounds.
  • If the alarm fails to sound, verify that the unit is plugged into a wall outlet if it is an AC-powered detector. Replace the batteries if it’s a DC unit.
  • Test again. Still no alarm? Replace the detector.

Replace the Batteries

Twice a year, install new batteries in a DC-powered detector. A detector that emits an intermittent chirp alarm may also require new backup batteries, which are utilized in the event of a household power failure.

Need to get in touch with us or schedule an appointment? Schedule online or call us at 770-253-2665 today!

Information courtesy of Detmer and Sons