Repair or Replace: That’s the Question

When should you repair an aging HVAC unit and when should you replace? Great question!

According to the National Association of Home Builder’s Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components, residential furnaces last 15-20 years. Energy Star believes a replacement is necessary if a heat pump or a/c is more than ten years old, a furnace is more than fifteen years old, equipment needs frequent repairs, energy bills are going up, a home has humidity problems, a home has excessive dust, or the heating and cooling system is noisy. Something else to keep in mind is that HVAC companies should take sizing of the unit keeping different housing/environmental issues in mind. However, precise life expectancy is difficult to pinpoint due to numerous factors such as climate, usage, maintenance, rating and more.

Consider replacement if the equipment is beyond 3/4 of the life expectancy and repairs will cost more than a third of replacement. For example: if your furnace is 15 years old and you’re facing a $750 repair, you should probably replace the unit. Keep in mind that you can also take this opportunity to improve your home comfort and lower your utility bill. In other words, don’t just settle with a single-stage 80% efficient furnace and be done with it – consider things like multiple staging, 95% efficiency and variable speed blowers to maximize your savings and comfort.

While there may never be a singular answer on when it is time to replace an HVAC unit instead of repair it, the decision should always come down to HVAC contractors doing their best work. In the end it should be the company, not the equipment that you invest your dollars in.

Thanks to ACHR News for the great information in this blog post.

Advertisements


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s